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Comfy Images Anonymous 09/06/2019 (Fri) 14:12:39 No.722
Post snug pictures. They don't have to be rainy or cold-looking, even though it helps.
Comforting fluff.
Rain and snow are great when you don't have to drive. Enjoying a hot cup of coffee during a raging thunderstorm with some light music in the background is peak comfy. Or some hot coco and reading during heavy snow.
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Is this comfy or uncomfy?
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Ive never been on a night train, but I imagine that it's extremely comfy.
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Here's one i took a long time ago
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>>1659 Comfy as long as you're inside looking out.
I'll dump some pictures I got off /retro/ and a Tumblr page a while ago.
I really like these old mall photos.
I can post some more if anyone wants some, but I don't want to clog the thread up anymore unless someone wants them.
>>2973 I love it, keep it coming. I can't lurk these threads too long, though, I get too nostalgic for a time that I wasn't even a part of. I also can't tell if they really were beautiful and nice places during a wonderful time to love, or if that's just the rose tinted glasses.
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>>2971 >>2972 >>2973 My god those places looks like such a good trucking time
>>2974 >I can't lurk these threads too long, though, I get too nostalgic for a time that I wasn't even a part of. I also can't tell if they really were beautiful and nice places during a wonderful time to love, or if that's just the rose tinted glasses. I know that feeling. I was born in the '90s but was lucky enough that I lived in a little town that was behind the times and was somewhat sheltered. These pictures remind me of the old mall in my hometown, which was small and chintzy but had a raised area with fake plants in the middle that I used to jump up and walk along the edge of. I can hear reverberating woodwind music in my head just thinking about it, but I'm not sure if they actually played anything like that or it's just a false memory.
>>2975 I remember how magical it felt visiting malls in bigger cities as a kid, and those didn't look anywhere near as nice as the ones in these pictures. I love the contrast between the lush indoor landscaping and the sleek, modern architecture.
It's a shame what happened to the malls. The convenience of online shopping surpasses the malls in terms of the level of choice and selection available to shoppers, but there was something to be said for the experience of just going through one and seeing what you could find without the knowledge that you could probably just find better products or deals on the Internet. Seeing these old pictures makes me want to live in some kind of a retrofuturistic, nature-oriented arcology.
>>2978 Yeah, they for sure knew how to build. Pretty incredible how even some of these (((modern))) architecture pulls it of when you put some greenery in it. A few of these wood be totally soul less without it.
>>2979 Modern architectural styles are my favorites, but I dislike it when architecture and urban planning try to completely cut us off from nature in the name of things like efficiency. I don't even know that I'd mind something in the way of Brutalism if it were livened up with greenery (although I'd be curious to see how it wood look with nicer building materials).
>>2978 >>2977 The heavy use of foliage really adds to the scenery, a far cry from the mega malls of today that have screens and banners eberrywhere, obfuscating whatever aesthetic may have been possible. I will also say the in-ground foliage like seen here >>2972 is probably my favorite architectural design, as opposed to something like here >>2976 in the first picture where the foliage is kind of elevated from the ground. There's a whole different feeling as if you're walking within nature, rather than walking around it or merelywitnessing a facsimile.
I once did a similar dump in /retro/, glad somebody also likes these kind of arch images. >>2967 Probably me but there's many here i didn't post, nice taste buddy, the green ones here >>2976 are berry cool indeed. Yeah i'm also a 90's kid but i did have many social clubs, pizzerias, cafes and other assorted places near me that were behind the times and still sported these early 80's looks. The trick about these old places was related to "feng shui", not really the spacial planning and pverly spiritual aspect of it but the concept of "maximalism" or throwing stuff to it until it feels "homely", a brand new and clean place was considered sterile and cold so interior designers back then added tons of stuff like statues, plants and reflective surfaces. Also always having a vantage point to a natural scape, for example a room with 4 walls needs one of them looking at nature like a garden, green wall or forest, if such a thing is not possible then use the ceiling and place windows to watch the sky and in some cases the architects use translucent floors or mezzanines (half-levels) to look oversee a lower-level garden. Kevin Roach is probably the chief example of this kind of architecture, a dirty jew with a funny anecdote but he (or his office) knew how to appease to the new age fanatics who wanted their shortened brand of feng. It is an effective way of doing harmonious places. >>2978 In first world countries malls have been slowly replaced by online shops but i can assure in not-first world countries, like latin america or eastern europe, malls are/were being build but in more effective ways to lower the maintenance resources, which are actually the main killer of them along with greedy rental prices. There's nothing like going on family or with friends to a mall and pass the time playing arcades or eating at the court. >>2980 >I don't even know that I'd mind something in the way of Brutalism if it were livened up with greenery I don't know if there was a series of videos or spokesmen or something that has been talking dookie about brutalism in recent years but there has been a big misconception about it, you see many of the pictures posted here are brutalism (including 3 of mine) it's just that people tend to remember the bottom of the barrel grey sterile block examples instead of seeing the general picture and then some of the decently made projects. There's always good architects and bad architects, but combined they are still much less than the amount of clients who want quick and cheap things without caring if it is actually good for them or for society. To save a few bucks many people will rather cut the window than add another one.
>>2982 >I once did a similar dump in /retro/, glad somebody also likes these kind of arch images. Yeah, I figured I'd post the ones I saved from the '80s nostalgia thread from before the images got shoahed. >The trick about these old places was related to "feng shui", not really the spacial planning and pverly spiritual aspect of it but the concept of "maximalism" or throwing stuff to it until it feels "homely", a brand new and clean place was considered sterile and cold so interior designers back then added tons of stuff like statues, plants and reflective surfaces. Also always having a vantage point to a natural scape, for example a room with 4 walls needs one of them looking at nature like a garden, green wall or forest, if such a thing is not possible then use the ceiling and place windows to watch the sky and in some cases the architects use translucent floors or mezzanines (half-levels) to look oversee a lower-level garden. That's pretty interesting. >In first world countries malls have been slowly replaced by online shops but i can assure in not-first world countries, like latin america or eastern europe, malls are/were being build but in more effective ways to lower the maintenance resources, which are actually the main killer of them along with greedy rental prices. There's nothing like going on family or with friends to a mall and pass the time playing arcades or eating at the court. Nice, I'm glad to hear that they're keeping them alive at least. >I don't know if there was a series of videos or spokesmen or something that has been talking dookie about brutalism in recent years but there has been a big misconception about it, you see many of the pictures posted here are brutalism (including 3 of mine) it's just that people tend to remember the bottom of the barrel grey sterile block examples instead of seeing the general picture and then some of the decently made projects. There's always good architects and bad architects, but combined they are still much less than the amount of clients who want quick and cheap things without caring if it is actually good for them or for society. To save a few bucks many people will rather cut the window than add another one. Yeah, I'm not educated about architecture enough to know exact definitions. When I hear "brutalism" I usually think of dreary Cold War-era tower blocks or the cityscapes of Conquest of the Planet of the Apes (filmed in the plaza of Century City).
That's about it for the kind of stuff I was posting before.
>>2984 >When I hear "brutalism" I usually think of dreary Cold War-era tower blocks Yeah they are the most notorious examples but in the trade they usually make us know always to avoid building such things, but on the streets clients always end up cutting so many costs that the only thing possible is a concrete block with fewest windows and forms possible. It's accepting to design such a thing or refusing and making someone else take the role until he or somebody else accepts, either out of money and/or necessity. There's no winning until the general population gets good taste, which is hard, but don't worry i was not trying to push you, we are just posting comf picshures. >>2992 Might as well post the rest i had somewhere here. I don't recall well the context and explanations i did before the dolphin deleted us, it was something about how pre-great depression aesthetics from Nouveau and Deco were revived in the luxurious projects from the late 70's and early 80's until the Reagan depression happened and it stalled for a while, ending in the early 90's.
The advantage/problem of black walls is that it constricts your vision a bit, making you feel more enclosed than with a light-painted wall. It also "forces" you to move or be near windows and nature.
In the second picture we can see an example of decently executed statue placement, if it wasn't for it with its subtle spot light the table wood look a bit more sterile or lifeless, even with the berry prominent plant enhanced with a harsh spot light. The pink image is something else, berry moody and typical of early 90's magazine ads. I once slept in a small garish hotel room in a worker's town with that look (also similar to third pic in >>2968) eberrything was plastic, the marble details and even the "steel" objects were plastic with silver paint on, and it all smelled like a sweet fruity cheap floor cleaner, almost bubblegummy. The bed was a hard rubber water mattress with fluffy black satin spreads, the lights were all colored (expect the mirror light in the bathroom) and the windows were tinted, outside they looked like black mirrors. A berry interesting experience, it's definitely a surreal one and worth the shame because my family and i learned later that it was a "kinky" room given to horny workers and expensive escorts. Ops.
>>2994 >Yeah they are the most notorious examples but in the trade they usually make us know always to avoid building such things, but on the streets clients always end up cutting so many costs that the only thing possible is a concrete block with fewest windows and forms possible. So it comes from the clients nowadays? People always make it sound like it's architects forcing it on the public. >There's no winning until the general population gets good taste, which is hard, but don't worry i was not trying to push you, we are just posting comf picshures. No offense taken. >Might as well post the rest i had somewhere here. I don't recall well the context and explanations i did before the dolphin deleted us, it was something about how pre-great depression aesthetics from Nouveau and Deco were revived in the luxurious projects from the late 70's and early 80's until the Reagan depression happened and it stalled for a while, ending in the early 90's. Yeah, I remember reading that. It's too bad it got deleted. I think it was interesting, especially since the pre-World War II decades of the 20th century are overall some of the most fascinating to me culturally besides the closing ones.
>>2997 >People always make it sound like it's architects forcing it on the public. It's both. The charismatic and "star"-powered architects can do almost whatever they want but they are enabled by powerful clients, sometimes the client himself is smart or knowledgeable enough that he can dictate exactly how he wants his building. In history the "bad" kind of architecture (monotonous, grey, mood killers) are a combination of heavily hidden agenda-biased architects (either communists or liberal school "avant garde") with rich clients from suspicious backgrounds or intentions (industrialists pushing new materials, real estate moguls making investments in minimalistic designs to sell them as art). You can take a wild guess about the ethnicity or social club they both come from The general population goes by these trends and merely wants something that looks like what the rich people are doing, when given a project they wood either tone it down so much that you end up with a cheap monotonous project without the finer details or with something almost complete fake (fake walls, fake materials, easily decaying details made from the cheapest plaster). Doesn't help the government also isn't usually interested in quality, in architecture you can get away with cutting corners that aren't going to be apparent until decades later so many agents usually use public works to steal or launder money. New materials are a double whammy too, some are easy as hell to apply and after a while the workers forget or simply don't want to do the older methods, and after much later the big companies can increase the prices of said materials and because nobody remembers how to do the old ways things get inflated artificially. For example in my region it's already hard to get workers who know how to layer bricks, they are so used to cinder blocks and pre-made wall systems that they can't make a straight line with normal standard orange bricks, so we need to bring special workers who charge extra for knowing the basics and prices get inflated, that pisses the client so many end up succumbing to the cinder block system.
>>2998 >In history the "bad" kind of architecture (monotonous, grey, mood killers) are a combination of heavily hidden agenda-biased architects (either communists or liberal school "avant garde") with rich clients from suspicious backgrounds or intentions (industrialists pushing new materials, real estate moguls making investments in minimalistic designs to sell them as art). You can take a wild guess about the ethnicity or social club they both come from It must be those dastardly Eskimos again. Do you by any chance know of a good general "architecture for retards" type of book for someone with almost zero knowledge?
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>>2982 >feng shui As tacky and new age as it sounds (unconscious) feng shui is something that has disappeared in architecture leading to buildings that have bad flow and navigation to them and don't feel comfortable to walk through because of it. Eberrything now is just designed to have necessities and not fall in on itself. >brutalism For me when brutalism tries to be artistic or attractive it makes it even more soulless because of it's pretention and insult to things that are artistic and attractive. Glass buildings and that French noveua architecture (see Lisbon and Finland) I also find ugly, minimalism seems to never look good for architecture. >>2997 >>2999 His art style reminds me of another artist who drew similar paintings except they had a mood of foreboding and depression. Someone compared it to the last episode of Tehxnolyze. >People always make it sound like it's architects forcing it on the public. The architect is not merely a pawn, he is an artist too and will sometimes try to sell something, something being an art style or genre.
>>2999 >"architecture for retards" type of book for someone with almost zero knowledge? A tough question, i read a ton back in the day but never an introductory text as i didn't find it necessary for my case. I heard a lot about a famous one, A History of Architecture by Banister Fletcher Sr. and Jr., supposedly it was the best you could get for pre-modern architecture in the old days, i think there's two versions with the latter ones being the resumed student's ones. It doesn't touch upon the modernist movements, which were and still are a whole 'nother story in terms of theory, so it's good for that but it does lack some stuff like a bunch of pre-hispanic architecture because back then there wasn't a lot of evidence surrounding it, the comprehensive studies happened until the 50's and eberryone who wanted to know about the ruins had to go there personally. This book is from the berry late 1890's with a revision around the mid-20's. Beware, it's a big book with around 1300+ pages, so if you want a shorter one then i don't know what to say, i can check and/or ask and get you some names but in terms of zero2hero lectures i think the massive acclaim that book has is probably justified. An obligatory writer for scrub-level students is the famous Francis Ching, or Frank Chink like eberrybody says, he wrote tons of introductory texts regarding the craft so probably he has one for history. And yes he has, it seems it's called A Global History of Architecture, that one is 800+ pages which is abnormally large for him but he's a relaxed read, i wood say he's probably your best bet and if you somehow want more he has other reads, the conceptual Form, Space, and Order is a modern classic for which he's known for so maybe that could be a second read, although also long-winded. Architecture is a highly mischievous field due to its denizens and performers but the art & craft itself is greatly rewarding, i woodn't take it too seriously and if i knew back then i woodn't even touch it professionally, it sucks the soul out of you which isn't comfy at all. A happy architect is as rare as a sober construction worker.
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>>3000 >His art style reminds me of another artist who drew similar paintings except they had a mood of foreboding and depression. Someone compared it to the last episode of Tehxnolyze. The car ones remind me of playing Outrun. >>3001 >An obligatory writer for scrub-level students is the famous Francis Ching, or Frank Chink like eberrybody says, he wrote tons of introductory texts regarding the craft so probably he has one for history. And yes he has, it seems it's called A Global History of Architecture, that one is 800+ pages which is abnormally large for him but he's a relaxed read, i wood say he's probably your best bet and if you somehow want more he has other reads, the conceptual Form, Space, and Order is a modern classic for which he's known for so maybe that could be a second read, although also long-winded. Thanks, that sounds like it's worth looking into.
>>2992 where are the first two pictures from?
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>>3047 I have no clue. This was my source for most of the pictures I put up before that post though: https://80sretroelectro.tumblr.com/tagged/scan Maybe the second one came from there.

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