/retro/ - Y2K

1990s and 2000s Nostalgia

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Subcultures and fashion of the 90s & 2000s Fellow Time Traveler 08/11/2021 (Wed) 09:36:23 No.1892
What subculture were you a part of, Fellow Time Travelers? 90s bros, did you go to rave parties? 2000s kids, did you get some of that easy emo pussy?
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I wish this was a real subculture
>>1892 >were Never grew out of being this metalhead sorta thing. >did you get some of that easy emo pussy? Yeah, but it wasn't easy, i'm just pussy worthy. >>1896 Cyberpunk is a genre of fiction that became real as technology advanced, living in a dystopia+gadgets irl isn't so romantic anymore when regular schmucks and their grandma are living it too. When a new thing starts becoming popular, it causes waves to ripple throughout society. Identity leaches are quick to feast on that meme energy. As this new thing gets assimilated in the collective consciousness, it starts losing momentum, eventually mainstream culture becomes unable to serve as a contrasting background for the new thing, so guys like OP can no longer score by exploiting it and the carcass of a dead subculture gets laid to a well earned rest.
>>1892 >What subculture were you a part of, Fellow Time Travelers? I was a metalhead who listened to older metal and punk bands and dressed like a dad. I wasn't really part of any scene but would sometimes talk with other people who were into vaguely the same stuff I was. A couple times I had guys I never met before come up to me and start talking to me because they knew what I was into. But overall I didn't really fit in anywhere. The music scene was small where I lived, and even people who liked some of the bands I did tended to be into metalcore/pop punk stuff I didn't care for. >2000s kids, did you get some of that easy emo pussy? No, but the weird thing is that there were seemingly a decent amount of girls who were into me I was a reclusive dork with bad fashion sense. Some of them were into the mallcore stuff that I hated, but I always thought scene girls were hot in spite of their bad taste in music.
Is neet gamer a culture?
>>1904 I was going to ask the same question.
>>1904 Being a neet gamer isn't a distinctly 90s or 2000s phenomenon
>>1907 it kinda is actually
>>1908 In the 00's it was (the MMORPG player) but in the 90's i think most gamers were too young and usually did have time to work part-time jobs for teenagers. I recall a second-cousin who was big into Playstation stuff and he still had time to be a soda bar worker serving snacks and soft drinks. It didn't last long because he was forced to get into college but i bet it was the best 2 years of his life.
>>1909 In the 90's you already had an entire generation who grew up playing games as kids in the late 80's and were perfectly positioned to be neets, especially with the advancing internet. You didn't really have that setup prior to the 90's because pre-NES generation, though they did have vidya, treated games more akin to board games and just general entertainment.
>>1892 I liked emo fashion because of how hot it was both on guys and girls, but mom was too controlling to allow me to take part in it. In fact I wasn't part of any subculture at all, didn't even have friends until I was 16. Though around that time I was able to fit in a bit with the gamers. The ones who sat around at lunch playing GBA/DS games, or messing with pokemagioh cards, or yammering about CS:S. But even then, I didn't play any of the games the others were playing just because I couldn't afford them. I feel robbed every time I think about this. Wish there was a way to make up for the fun I missed out on growing up.
>>1911 >both on guys fuck off faggot
>>1912 I'd have to agree with him there. I found them attractive too.
>>1913 You are a faggot too.
>>1911 As long as you were pale and skinny emo scene got laid pretty easy, much more than other sub-cultures bar niggers doing their thing. >on guys No wonder you picked emos you homo, your mom saved you from future shame.
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Kek this reminds me, I seriously thought this dude from a German emo band was a girl. I was shocked when I discovered he is a guy.
>>1918 Always laughed at the pasta posted on the old site about him especially because i wrote it And in that pic he's old already, in the early days he really looked like a girl, germans had a moral problem there with him being a dude because the underage thing didn't really phase them.
I was a mid-to-late 2000s teen, but instead of getting emo/scene kid pussy I mostly hung out with my fellow "too cool to be nerds, too nerdy to be cool" dorks, which featured approximately zero girls. We did have a guy who could do Jumpstyle though, so there was that. I did occasionally hang out with the emo/scene kids (I had emo-ish hair that covered half my face so I could blend right in), but I was never really "one of them" because I didn't like the music and I thought makeup and skinny jeans on guys was "teh gay".
When did the emo/scene subculture become a thing? I can think back and remember a few people who looked could protentually be considered proto-emo, but I don't think there was any mainstream "I'm a part of this subculture" behaviour.
Forgot to add, ^ was for around 2004-2005
>>1910 >treated games more akin to board games and just general entertainment. Remote multiplayer didn't really exist at the scale later seen in the 90s. There were a few multiplayer games where you could dial into your friends modem, but mass-multiplayer was rare. The game 'Habitat' was an exception, in not being text and turn based. Every MM game would need a bank of modems, since the common interconnected network didn't really exist for the average person. Staying connected to a long-distance modem for any length of time, would be expensive in those days.
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>>1909 >In the 00's it was (the MMORPG player) but in the 90's i think most gamers were too young and usually did have time to work part-time jobs for teenagers. I know of a few people that got hooked on MMORPGs when they first came out, and prioritized them over other, more importaint things. This was at the very end of the 90s so it's not representative of the prior 4/5ths of the decade. EverQuest, aka EverCrack, ruined more than a few people and broadband Internet made it possible for being ever connected.
>>1925 I don't know when exactly it started, but where I live (UK) the emo thing was huge around 2005-2006, and the "scene kid" thing (which was basically all the same people -- I think they just got bored of the color black) was big around 2007-2010. They always huddled together in groups, and you'd often see hundreds of them gathered around chatting to each other outside the clothes shops that catered to that crowd.
>>1925 I first remember hearing the term "emo" around 2006 (2007 at the latest) as an insult for a Hot Topic kid my friend knew. Where I lived, the window of time seemed really short before the "emo kid" subculture transitioned into "scene kid." I even remember seeing a person or two wearing Tripp pants in the pre-scene period. My area was far from being up to date as far as trends went, but I didn't mind.
>>1929 >I don't know when exactly it started, but where I live (UK) the emo thing was huge around 2005-2006, and the "scene kid" thing (which was basically all the same people -- I think they just got bored of the color black) was big around 2007-2010. I sort of remember emo people around that time frame, but oddly enough, the only signs of "scene kids" I saw, were online. For me, Hipsters started entering the picture around 2007. >>1930 >I even remember seeing a person or two wearing Tripp pants in the pre-scene period. I had to lookup what those are. I've seen them before, but did not know they were associated with anything.
>>1935 >I had to lookup what those are. I've seen them before, but did not know they were associated with anything. They were a mainstay of mallgoth fashion during the pre-"emo" days, and there were apparently a handful of people still wearing them a bit later on.
I associated the ammo beld always with emo subculture - talking about the punk image on english wikipedia for Tripp pants
>>1951 I always associated them with thrash and black metal. I think it might have started with Motorhead, and they were so influential to early extreme metal that it became a trend.
>>1892 Phat pants, lol I remember those.
I was in the target demographic for all those emo/scene/etc etc subcultures back in their day, I didn't like them and was never part of any of them, but now I miss them... I mean, I would hang out with people who were part of them and I guess I was always secretly fascinated with the whole thing, their imagery and whatnot. On a related note, I had a crush in highschool who was deep into the whole thing and styled herself that way, the dyed and straightened hair, the makeup, the black and pink clothes, the hoodies with cat ears, the slit wrists, the whole shebang. Now I see her from time to time turned into a completely normal woman and it just makes me melancholic. Another thing is that those cultures were innocent I guess, it was all about fashion and music and feelings, while subcultures today are all about politics.
>>1955 True they are also part of the Metal scene. But I mean the "hanging" wearing style. Just as some sort of obviously accesior
I was just the depressed fat kid who wore all black listening to mallcore like metallica and manson while thinking it was heavy metal.
>>1979 Metallica is metal and not at all mallcore, although I guess St. Anger kind of flirted with mallcore. Marilyn Manson is both.
>>1959 >Another thing is that those cultures were innocent I guess, it was all about fashion and music and feelings, while subcultures today are all about politics. Indeed, it must suck being a kind in school right now. I don't remember politics being all that important to kids until they went off to higher education, and even then, it was still cringe to see inexperienced youth knowing how to solve the worlds problems.
>>1981 Load, Reload and half of the Black Album are the archetypical mallmetal stuff. >>1997 lol, edgy angry teenagers being more prone to common sense than some college students was always a naive but ironic sight to see and hear at parties or hangouts. >Hangouts Now that's something that i see lost even before pandemic times, it was normal to gather 5 or even 10 people (sometimes more) and roam like a gang to anywhere and just shoot the shit telling jokes or doing stuff on the spot, recently it wasn't normal to see other than the eternal 2 or 3 close friends planning to do something.

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